Last edited by Batilar
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

4 edition of Encyclopedia of the Black Death found in the catalog.

Encyclopedia of the Black Death

by Joseph Patrick Byrne

  • 352 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by ABC-CLIO in Santa Barbara, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Black Death,
  • Encyclopedias,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 375-404) and index.

    StatementJoseph P. Byrne
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC172 .B98 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxii, 429 p. :
    Number of Pages429
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25202478M
    ISBN 101598842536, 1598842544
    ISBN 109781598842531, 9781598842548
    LC Control Number2011031689
    OCLC/WorldCa729344530

      All entries conclude with a list of references, and see also references are included, where helpful. A glossary, an extensive bibliography, and a general index round out the work. This single-volume resource will serve as a good starting point for research on the Black Death." - Booklist "This is a terrific subject encyclopedia/5(1). The first outbreak of the Black Death indisputably was the deadliest but the death rate varied widely according to place and social stratum. National estimates of mortality for England, where the evidence is fullest, range from five percent, to percent among aristocrats holding land from the king, to forty to forty—five percent of the.

    The bubonic plague was the most commonly seen form during the Black Death, with a mortality rate of % and symptoms including fever of 38 - 41 °C ( °F), headaches, painful aching joints, nausea and vomiting, and a general feeling of malaise. The Black Death Overview. The pandemic of bubonic plague that swept across Europe between and is known today as the Black Death, though contemporaries called it the "Great Pestilence," and the disease itself was generally known as peste. During these years, plague affected the lives of all Europeans, and killed nearly half of them.

      The Black Death, also known as The Plague, was a pandemic affecting most of Europe and large swaths of Asia from through that wiped out between and million people in just a few short years. Caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, which is often carried by fleas found on rodents, the plague was a lethal disease that often carried with it symptoms like vomiting, pus-filled. He has conducted research and published articles on a wide variety of subjects, from Roman catacombs to American urbanization, though his area of expertise is Italy in the era of the Black Death. He is the author of The Black Death (Greenwood, ) and Daily Life during the Black Death .


Share this book
You might also like
Third report for session 1988-89

Third report for session 1988-89

Two Nations, Many Cultures

Two Nations, Many Cultures

Religions in Japan.

Religions in Japan.

Letters from a merchant in England, to a gentleman in Ireland

Letters from a merchant in England, to a gentleman in Ireland

Clerical workers pay.

Clerical workers pay.

Report on phase I, Marine magnetometer survey in Deaths Door Passage, Door County, Wisconsin, 1989

Report on phase I, Marine magnetometer survey in Deaths Door Passage, Door County, Wisconsin, 1989

Ha kon Bleken

Ha kon Bleken

Coast Guard drug interdiction

Coast Guard drug interdiction

hidden heritage =

hidden heritage =

In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU II) Technical Interchange Meeting

In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU II) Technical Interchange Meeting

City of Cornwall

City of Cornwall

clinical aid for pediatric drug therapy

clinical aid for pediatric drug therapy

Canciones and the early poetry of Lorca

Canciones and the early poetry of Lorca

American orientalism

American orientalism

Practical guide to Timeworks Publisher 2 on the PC

Practical guide to Timeworks Publisher 2 on the PC

The Fixed Stars, Health and Behavior Imbalances

The Fixed Stars, Health and Behavior Imbalances

Loving and losing.

Loving and losing.

Encyclopedia of the Black Death by Joseph Patrick Byrne Download PDF EPUB FB2

Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A–Z encyclopedia to cover the Encyclopedia of the Black Death book plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from – It also bookends the period with entries on Biblical plagues and the Plague of Justinian, as well as modern-era material /5(2).

Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A–Z encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from – It also bookends the period with entries on Biblical plagues and the Plague of Cited by:   Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A-Z encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from It also bookends the period with entries on Biblical plagues and the Plague of Justinian, as well as modern-era4/5(2).

This encyclopedia provides interdisciplinary, cross-referenced entries that document the effect of the plague on Western society across the four centuries of the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors.

Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A-Z encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from It also bookends the period with entries on Biblical plagues and the Plague of 5/5(1).

Black Death, pandemic that ravaged Europe between andtaking a proportionately greater toll of life than any other known epidemic or war up to that time. The Black Death is widely thought to have been the result of plague, caused by infection with the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

The Black Death (also known as the Pestilence, the Great Mortality, or the Plague) was the deadliest pandemic recorded in human history.

The Black Death resulted in the deaths of up to 75– million people in Eurasia and North Africa, peaking in Europe from to Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, was the cause; Y.

pestis infection most commonly results in. Black Death 1 Black Death Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible () The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between and It is widely thought to have been an outbreak of plague caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, an argument supported by.

Plague, infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis, a bacterium transmitted from rodents to humans by the bite of infected fleas. Plague has caused some of the most-devastating epidemics in history.

It was the disease behind the Black Death of the 14th century, when as much as one-third of Europe’s population died. In his book The Black Death and the Transformation of the West, David Herlihy explained: The basic unit of production was the small peasant farm, worked with an essentially stagnant technique.

The only growth the system allowed was the multiplication of farm units subject to the law of diminishing returns. Encyclopedia of the Black Death by Joseph P.

Byrne,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Get this from a library. Encyclopedia of the Black Death. [Joseph Patrick Byrne] -- This encyclopedia provides interdisciplinary, cross-referenced entries that document the effect of the plague on Western society across the four centuries of the second plague pandemic, balancing.

This single-volume resource will serve as a good starting point for research on the Black Death." - Booklist--This text refers to the hardcover edition. About the Author. Joseph P. Byrne, PhD, is an historian and professor of honors humanities at Belmont University, Nashville, TN.5/5(1).

This encyclopedia provides interdisciplinary, cross-referenced entries that document the effect of the plague on Western society across the four centuries of the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors.

Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A-Z encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic. Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first A-Z encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from Encyclopedia of the Black Death Encyclopedia of the Black Death.

Editor/Author Byrne, Joseph P. Publication Year: Publisher: ABC-CLIO. ISBN: Category: History - World history Image Count: 45 Book Status: Pending Predicted Release Month: Table of Contents. 21 books based on 12 votes: World Without End by Ken Follett, In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made by Norman F.

Cantor, The B. The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression is a book by Stéphane Courtois, Nicolas Werth, Andrzej Paczkowski and several other European academics documenting a history of political repressions by communist states, including genocides, extrajudicial executions, deportations, killing populations in labor camps and artificially created famines.

The Black Death was the fourteenth century's equivalent of a nuclear war. It wiped out one-third of Europe's population, taking millions of lives.

The author draws together the most recent scientific discoveries and historical research to pierce the mist and tell the story of the Black Death as a gripping, intimate narrative. Encyclopedia of the Black Death: Volume 1 - Ebook written by Joseph Patrick Byrne. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Encyclopedia of the Black Death: Volume 1. Encyclopedia of the Black Death. by Joseph P.

Byrne. Although scholars are reluctant to set percentage figures, it is generally agreed that of those infected with plague, more than 30%—and perhaps as many as 45%—died: as many as 25, to o, in .Product Information. Encyclopedia of the Black Death is the first AZ encyclopedia to cover the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors and effects in Europe and the Islamic world from Encyclopedia of the Black Death Book Summary: This encyclopedia provides interdisciplinary, cross-referenced entries that document the effect of the plague on Western society across the four centuries of the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors.

• A–Z interdisciplinary entries on medical.